Teaching Treaties K-12

Teaching Treaties K-12 in the classroom has always been one of our primary focuses. Over the years we have worked with various organizations and entities to make this a reality. 

Teaching Treaties K-12 in Manitoba was inspired by the work of the Office of the Treaty Commissioner in Saskatchewan. Today, Teaching Treaties K-12 in Manitoba acts as a model for similar movements in other provinces. 

We continue to work with entities such as the Assembly of Manitoba Chiefs, Crown-Indigenous Relations, Manitoba Education and the Manitoba First Nations Education Resource Centre to increase the knowledge and understanding of Treaties for students in Manitoba. This approach has fulfilled our overarching objective – to develop educational resources for teachers, so students in kindergarten to grade 12 can learn about the importance of the Treaties and the Treaty relationship. 

Teaching Treaties K-12 is for all Manitoba students. We want to provide resources that will enable them to demonstrate knowledge of the topics, concepts and understandings of the Treaties and the Treaty relationship by the time they graduate. 

The Teaching Treaties K-12 team will be forever grateful to the Council of Elders for their leadership and guidance during the development of Teaching Treaties K-12. In addition, we thank them for their continued support and participation at each and every training session we offer.

About the Treaty Education K-12

What is the Treaty Education K-12?

Treaty education is for all Manitoba students from Kindergarten to Grade 12 and we want to provide resources that will enable them to demonstrate knowledge of the topics, concepts and understandings of the Treaties and the Treaty relationship by the time they graduate.

As part of our process, we also provide Treaty education training and tools for teachers to help them build a curriculum that can be delivered to their students.

The Treaty Education team will be forever grateful to the Council of Elders for their leadership and guidance throughout the development of these teaching resources, beginning with their initial input on what topics and themes were to be included, to the Ceremonial event at Manitou Api that began our training journey. We are grateful for their continued support and participation.

Treaty Education BACKGROUNDER Updated 8 Sept 2020

K-12 Treaty Education Continuum 2009-2021

Treaty Education Facts

Treaty Education: The First Decade

  • Why Treaty Education? Recognizing a gap in teaching and learning materials about Treaties and the Treaty relationship, the TRCM agreed the best way to support Manitoba educators was to design a suite of pedagogical materials fortified with immersive teacher training.
  • Treaty Education began in 2009-2010 as the Treaty Education Initiative. As a K-12 program, its aims were, and remain, to teach the knowledge, skills, and attitudes central to understanding Treaties and the Treaty relationship into school curricula. 
  • After extensive consultations, piloting, and teacher training, the Treaty Education Kit was finalized in 2014; containing a curated set of pedagogical assets intended to complement and enhance Manitoba curricula. 
  • The Kit contains thirteen grade level teacher resource guides framed on four curricular ‘Big Ideas’: Relationships, Traditional Teachings, History, and Treaties. Complementing the guides are textual materials for both teaching and learning, video resources, children’s readers, posters, maps, a timeline, literature, and manipulatives. 
  • Following 10 years of extensive training and uptake in the province’s schools, the word initiative was dropped and the program became simply Teaching Treaties K-12.

If you would like further information on the development process please do not hesitate to contact our Education Manager. View the full Treaty Education Backgrounder (PDF) here. Our office keeps detailed statistical data on all the training sessions from over the past 10 years, please contact our Treaty Education Admin Asst. If you require information for individual school divisions.